Aeschines (The Oratory of Classical Greece, Vol. 3; Michael Gagarin,

Aeschines (The Oratory of Classical Greece, Vol. 3; Michael Gagarin,

Language: English

Pages: 270

ISBN: 0292712235

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This is the third volume in the Oratory of Classical Greece series. Planned for publication over several years, the series will present all of the surviving speeches from the late fifth and fourth centuries B.C. in new translations prepared by classical scholars who are at the forefront of the discipline. These translations are especially designed for the needs and interests of today's undergraduates, Greekless scholars in other disciplines, and the general public.

Classical oratory is an invaluable resource for the study of ancient Greek life and culture. The speeches offer evidence on Greek moral views, social and economic conditions, political and social ideology, and other aspects of Athenian culture that have been largely ignored: women and family life, slavery, and religion, to name just a few.

This volume contains the three surviving speeches of Aeschines (390-? B.C.). His speeches all revolve around political developments in Athens during the second half of the fourth century B.C. and reflect the internal political rivalries in an Athens overshadowed by the growing power of Macedonia in the north. The first speech was delivered when Aeschines successfully prosecuted Timarchus, a political opponent, for having allegedly prostituted himself as a young man. The other two speeches were delivered in the context of Aeschines' long-running political feud with Demosthenes. As a group, the speeches provide important information on Athenian law and politics, Demosthenes and his career, sexuality and social history, and the historical rivalry between Athens and Macedonia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

turn to the examination of Timarchus’ way of life, so you will realize how much it differs from In the fourth century, there were two legal procedures for attacking measures placed before the Assembly. Decrees were exposed to the graphe¯ paranomo¯n, ‘‘indictment for illegality/illegal legislation’’ (on the ground that in form or content they breached an existing law), laws to the graphe¯ nomon me¯ epite¯deion theinai, ‘‘indictment for having made an inexpedient /disadvantageous law.’’ If the

restoration of the democracy (preceding note). The revised code came into effect in the archonship of Euclides (403/2) and in the case of new provisions was not retroactive. 42 38 aeschines that I am dwelling excessively on every detail. I shall confine my account to the men in whose house he has lived, bringing shame on his own body and the city, earning a living from the very practice that the law forbids a man to engage in, or forfeit the right to address the people. [41] There is a man

the allied decision, though you were willing to obey it. For the allies declared that the city should wait for the envoys from the Greek cities, while Demosthenes, who changes tack more rapidly and blatantly than any man alive, has prevented you from waiting for them, not only by his arguments but by his acts and his decree, by ordering you to decide at once.82 The regular spring meeting in the theatre of Dionysus dealt with matters relating to the festival; cf. Demosthenes 21.8. See further

and he argues further that Demosthenes was especially liable because he was simultaneously teichopoios and overseer of the Theoric Fund (24 –27).7 In 28 –31 he refutes the claim that Demosthenes was exempt from audit because he was appointed by his tribe, not by the Assembly. In 32 – 48 Aeschines presents the second technical objection, that the law does not allow crowning in the theatre, only in the Assembly. In anticipation of a defense plea that the law allows exceptions, Aeschines insists

and he argues further that Demosthenes was especially liable because he was simultaneously teichopoios and overseer of the Theoric Fund (24 –27).7 In 28 –31 he refutes the claim that Demosthenes was exempt from audit because he was appointed by his tribe, not by the Assembly. In 32 – 48 Aeschines presents the second technical objection, that the law does not allow crowning in the theatre, only in the Assembly. In anticipation of a defense plea that the law allows exceptions, Aeschines insists

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