Hello Goodbye Hello: A Circle of 101 Remarkable Meetings

Hello Goodbye Hello: A Circle of 101 Remarkable Meetings

Language: English

Pages: 384

ISBN: 1451684517

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


From one of England’s wittiest writers, a “captivating, glittering, engaging, entertaining confection” (Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times) of 101 unlikely encounters between pairs of historical figures from Salvador Dali and Sigmund Freud to Marilyn Monroe and Frank Lloyd Wright.

IMAGINE THESE UNLIKELY—BUT TRUE—ENCOUNTERS:

Martha Graham and Madonna

Igor Stravinsky and Walt Disney

Frank Lloyd Wright and Marilyn Monroe

Marilyn Monroe and Nikita Khrushchev

President Richard M. Nixon and Elvis Presley

Harpo Marx and George Bernard Shaw

Salvador Dali and Sigmund Freud

Groucho Marx and T. S. Eliot

BRILLIANT IN CONCEPTION AND DIZZYING IN EXECUTION, Hello Goodbye Hello is a daisy chain of 101 fascinating true encounters, chance meetings, and disastrous collisions between the celebrated and the gifted, the famous and the infamous. Witty and wicked, Hello Goodbye Hello is the perfect example that truth is stranger than fiction (and infinitely more enjoyable).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jonathan and Kalyani Katz, Hugo Vickers, the late Hugh Massingberd, and to everyone who remembered, however hazily, once reading something about someone meeting someone else. © PHOTOGRAPH BY JONATHAN PLAYER CRAIG BROWN has been a columnist for Private Eye magazine in London for 22 years. He writes a twice-weekly column for London’s Daily Mail and is a frequent contributor to Vanity Fair. Well known as a parodist, he has been called “a genius” by Auberon Waugh, “the most screamingly funny

actor, surly and unpredictable. Though Elizabeth Taylor is a year younger than James Dean, she belongs to an earlier generation of old-fashioned, glamorous, self-confident, untouchable stars, whereas he heralds a new generation: scruffy, grunting, brooding, callow. They are to act together in Giant, Elizabeth Taylor as the wife of a Texas cattle baron, James Dean as the troublesome ranch-hand who strikes oil. They are introduced a few days before filming begins. To everyone’s surprise, he charms

attorney complains, ‘The police had murder on their minds!’ He is unimpressed. ‘I should hope to God that the police had murder on their minds, with a woman less than an hour dead, shot in the face, bleeding from the mouth, her teeth all over the floor, life over, in a French bergère chair in the foyer of a Castle, and an arrogant man in a house full of guns who had to be Tasered by police. I think that’s cause for having murder on your mind.’ The trial has been going for just a few days when

Broadstairs in Kent, he attends St Peters Primary School until the age of ten, then gains a scholarship to Chatham House, the fee-paying county grammar school in Ramsgate, three miles down the coast. Though never an outstanding pupil – in classes of thirty, he tends to hover somewhere between fifth and sixteenth – he is a hard worker. He is always immaculately dressed, his hair neat and tidy. But he is not matey, and never joins a gang.108 He rises to become a conscientious – some would say

letters with you? GALLOWAY: Has anyone got any sensible questions? HITCHENS: Or the email? GALLOWAY: You’re a drink-soaked, bloated – AMERICAN REPORTER: Are you going to answer his question? The substance of his question? GALLOWAY: I’m here to talk to the Senate. Hitchens followed him inside the building, and continued to barrack him with questions. Perhaps unsurprisingly, ‘a fresh hose of abuse was turned on me’. GALLOWAY: Your hands are shaking. You badly need another drink. HITCHENS:

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