Miracles and Massacres: True and Untold Stories of the Making of America

Miracles and Massacres: True and Untold Stories of the Making of America

Glenn Beck

Language: English

Pages: 304

ISBN: 1476771200

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


HISTORY AS IT'S SUPPOSED TO BE TOLD: TRUE AND THRILLING.

History is about so much more than memorizing facts. It is, as more than half of the word suggests, about the story. And, told in the right way, it is the greatest one ever written: Good and evil, triumph and tragedy, despicable acts of barbarism and courageous acts of heroism.

The things you've never learned about our past will shock you. The reason why gun control is so important to government elites can be found in a story about Athens that no one dares teach. Not the city in ancient Greece, but the one in 1946 Tennessee. The power of an individual who trusts his gut can be found in the story of the man who stopped the twentieth hijacker from being part of 9/11. And a lesson on what happens when an all-powerful president is in need of positive headlines is revealed in a story about eight saboteurs who invaded America during World War II.

Miracles and Massacres is history as you've never heard it told. It's incredible events that you never knew existed. And it's stories so important and relevant to today that you won't have to ask, Why didn't they teach me this? You will instantly know. If the truth shall set you free, then your freedom begins on page one of this book. By the end, your understanding of the lies and half-truths you've been taught may change, but your perception of who we are as Americans and where our country is headed definitely will.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tracks. Henry’s fingers drummed even faster now. His eyes narrowed. He could hardly wait for the fun to begin. Patrick Henry was ready to go in for the kill. Richmond, Virginia Theatre Square (“The New Academy”) Broad Street, between Twelfth and Fourteenth Streets June 4, 1788 The kill would not be so easy. Patrick Henry estimated that 80 percent of all Virginians stood opposed to this new Constitution, but he knew that his opponents, the Federalists, had done their homework. They had

some heckling, but don’t let it worry you—it all added to the theater.” Edison chuckled. “I also heard that the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals won a reprieve for a second dog. Splendid.” “Yes, I’ve heard that as well,” Brown said. He seemed to relax after hearing that Edison had not brought him here for a reprimand, but he kept respectfully silent. Edison continued: “Harold, as you know, the legislature passed an electric execution law. In the same session, they set up a

say the same thing!” Edison swiveled toward the doctor. “And you call this a grand thing? You two have ruined me!” Both men stood up sheepishly. “Harold, I never want to see your name in print. If I ever see or hear of you again, I’ll have you arrested, even if I have to trump up charges. Do you understand me?” “Yes, sir.” “Good. Now get out.” Edison ran his fingers through his hair and sighed. He told himself his reputation could be salvaged, that he never gave up and had never been

simultaneously fearless and feared by others. “Colonel Banastre Tarleton doesn’t desire acclaim from the throne for his courage alone, but also for his genius. Our gracious Royal does not always appreciate a soldier whose mind is as sharp as his sword.” After another round of silence, the young soldier finally mustered up the courage to voice the question he’d come over to ask. “So is it true? About the names they use for you?” Tarleton smiled, knowing he’d earned his monikers honestly. “You

two theaters in town was showing a western. Bill loved John Wayne. His cause was always just, his aim always true. The Daily Post-Athenian called the young actor’s early films B-movies, but Bill didn’t pay much attention to the newspaper. He could neither afford a copy nor read much of it. There were schools in McMinn County, but not good ones. After about twenty minutes, a voice from the distance called, “Billy! Dinner!” The broad-shouldered boy kept picking the berries. “Billy!” It had

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