Monster Loyalty: How Lady Gaga Turns Followers into Fanatics

Monster Loyalty: How Lady Gaga Turns Followers into Fanatics

Jackie Huba

Language: English

Pages: 224

ISBN: 1591846501

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Famous for her avant-garde outfits, over-the-top performances, and addictive dance beats, Lady Gaga is one of the most successful pop musicians of all time. But behind her showmanship lies another achievement: her wildly successful strategy for attracting and keeping insanely loyal fans. She's one of the most popular social media voices in the world with more than 33 million Twitter followers and 55 million Facebook fans. And she got there by methodically building a grassroots base of what she calls her "Little Monsters" - passionate fans who look to her not just for music but also for joy, inspiration, and a sense of community.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

her in his videos and quoted her lyrics to provide guidance to others. He even made a video for the It Gets Better Project, a nonprofit organization with a Web site dedicated to preventing teen suicide, saying that Lady Gaga always made him happy, letting him know that he was “born this way.” Ultimately unable to escape incessant bullying, Jamey took his own life in September 2011. His last Twitter message was to his idol: “@ladygaga bye mother monster, thank you for all you have done, paws up

it. As the first few strains of “Born This Way” began to fill the giant Staples Center in Los Angeles, Gaga was wheeled out on to the stage, now inside a larger version of the vessel. In a low-pitched voice, Gaga spoke the opening lines to the song, “It doesn’t matter if you love him or capital H-I-M . . . Just put your paws up. . . . ’Cause you were born this way, baby . . .” A top hatch in the vessel slid open. Gaga, dressed in a nude-colored latex ensemble, with microphone in hand, emerged

http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/completelist/0,29569,1984685,00.html; “Music’s Top 40 Money Makers 2011,” Billboard, February 11, 2011, http://www.billboard.com/features/music-s-top-40-money-makers-2011-1005031152.story#/features/music-s-top-40-money-makers-2011-1005031152.story?page=5; Dorothy Pomerantz, “Lady Gaga Tops Celebrity 100 List,” May 18, 2011, Forbes, http://www.forbes.com/2011/05/16/lady-gaga-tops-celebrity-100-11.html. I started following her on . . . Lady Gaga’s

One Degree, April 15, 2008, http://www.onedegree.ca/2008/04/five-questions.html. “Our goals for the trip . . .” Ibid. According to Saul, they “were able to track . . .” Ibid. “Customers are always more than . . .” Ibid. “It’s clearly too bad . . .” Donna Vitan, April 2nd, 2008 (11:28 p.m.) comment on Saul Colt, “Our Trip May Be Over but the Adventure Isn’t!” FreshBooks (blog), March 8, 2008, http://roadburn.freshbooks.com/2008/03/18/our-trip-may-be-over-but-the-adventure-isnt.

value proposition of building their products on the nascent computer company’s hardware. It was an uphill battle for Kawasaki and his compatriots at Apple. They were up against behemoth IBM, thirty-five times bigger, decades older, and embraced by businesspeople. At this time, in 1983, Apple didn’t even have a working prototype, so they couldn’t compete on features. But they did have a dream to increase the productivity and creativity of people by challenging the status quo. It was Kawasaki’s job

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