Sherry Wines: From Origins to Food Pairing: Types, process, wineries, and why most sherries are not sweet!

Sherry Wines: From Origins to Food Pairing: Types, process, wineries, and why most sherries are not sweet!

Alfredo de la Casa

Language: English

Pages: 118

ISBN: 1493560034

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


I love wine, and if anything I like more than drinking wine is sharing my knowledge and expertise about it, and this is the third wine related book that I write (see the back to know more about my other books). Although I grew up in Spain, I only discovered sherry in my 30s, and is such a hidden gem, so under valued, and so nice, that it should be shared! The first thing I want to tell you is that the concept most people have about sherry is totally wrong: sherry is not a sweet wine (at least most of them are not), and is not a drink for grandmothers! I will explain why and I will also explain to you why such misconception. You should buy and read this book if you want to know more about sherry, the different types, and how to choose the ones you like more, or which are more likely to go better with you; how to pair the different types of sherry with food, and know a few more things about it. I like good but simple things in life, so expect my book to be simple (and hopefully good), but do not expect to find a lot of technical information: in my experience most people want to get useful knowledge without becoming experts, and nearly everyone loves a book that it is enjoyable and easy to read, so these are my aims. Having said that, for those of you who want to know more, there are several detailed chapters giving the ins and outs of Sherry production. I hope you enjoy it, and that soon you start sharing some of the amazing sherries with your friends. I am writing something about the history of sherry, for those who want to know more, but I am doing so at the end of the book, so that if you are not interested you do not need to read the last chapter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sized, thin-skinned berries which are yellowish green in colour. The grapes are juicy, fragile, sweet and flavourful with colourless juice. The buds of the sub-variety Palomino Fin, which is the most commonly used throughout the region - sprout during the last fortnight in March and ripen in early September. Yields are in the order of 80 hectolitres per hectare, registering around 11 degrees Baumé and low acidity. It is well adapted to the region, being highly resistant to a wide variety of

under the name of "de Chipiona". Other names used are: Moscatel de Alejandría, Moscatel gordo, Moscatel de España, etc. The variety originated in Africa, although it is now cultivated in many vine-growing regions throughout world, and there were already references made to it by Columela, writing in early Christian times. In the Jerez region it gives special sweet wines which bear its name, usually coming from "sunned" grapes of the highest quality. The vines of this variety are best suited to

allows the conservation of the characteristic original pale yellow colour in the final blending. Analytical Data Alcoholic content of: between 15,5 and 22% vol. Sugar: 45 - 115 gr. / litre Total acidity (tartaric): 3 - 5 gr. / litre Volatile acidity (acetic): < 0,4 gr. / litre Very low glycerine content. (< 2 gr. / litre) Serving and pairing Tips Pale Cream must be served chilled, at around 10º C. The ideal wine to pair with foie and pâté. Very pleasant with fresh fruit (pear).

sharing some of the amazing sherries with your friends. I am writing something about the history of sherry, for those who want to know more, but I am doing so at the end of the book, so that if you are not interested you do not need to read the last chapter. Finally I have listed some of the man Sherry wineries, with some information about them, address, etc. Alfredo de la Casa adelacasa@greentalent.co.uk Acknowledgements I would like to give my sincere thanks to the following

then destined to lose its film of flor and along with it the protection which it provided against contact with oxygen. Once in direct contact with air, the wine begins to undergo a slow but inexorable process of oxidation, easily appreciated by the gradual darkening in the colour of the wine: this is OXIDATIVE AGENING. Both types of ageing produce different types of sherry wine, this therefore being one of the key factors when it comes to understanding the huge diversity of Sherry. After

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