The New Geography of Jobs

The New Geography of Jobs

Enrico Moretti

Language: English

Pages: 304

ISBN: 0544028058

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


"A persuasive look at why some U.S. cities have prospered in recent decades while others have declined."—Bloomberg Businessweek


We’re used to thinking of the United States in opposing terms: red versus blue, haves versus have-nots. But today there are three Americas. At one extreme are the brain hubs—cities like San Francisco, Boston, and Durham—with workers who are among the most productive, creative, and best paid on the planet. At the other extreme are former manufacturing capitals, which are rapidly losing jobs and residents. The rest of America could go either way. For the past thirty years, the three Americas have been growing apart at an accelerating rate. This divergence is one the most important developments in the history of the United States and is reshaping the very fabric of our society, affecting all aspects of our lives, from health and education to family stability and political engagement. But the winners and losers aren’t necessarily who you’d expect.

Enrico Moretti’s groundbreaking research shows that you don’t have to be a scientist or an engineer to thrive in one of the brain hubs. Carpenters, taxi-drivers, teachers, nurses, and other local service jobs are created at a ratio of five-to-one in the brain hubs, raising salaries and standard of living for all. Dealing with this split—supporting growth in the hubs while arresting the decline elsewhere—is the challenge of the century, and The New Geography of Jobs lights the way.

"Moretti has written a clear and insightful account of the economic forces that are shaping America and its regions, and he rightly celebrates human capital and innovation as the fundamental sources of economic development."—Jonathan Rothwell, The Brookings Institution

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Melinda Gates Foundation, [>] Gauthier-Loiselle, Marjolaine, [>], [>] Genentech, [>] General Electric, [>], [>] General Motors, [>]–[>], [>] Gentrification, [>]–[>] and Empowerment Zones, [>] Geography of inequality, [>]–[>] and charity, [>]–[>] and divorce rate, [>]–[>], [>] and life expectancy, [>]–[>] and social multiplier effect, [>]–[>] and political participation, [>]–[>] Geography of jobs, [>], [>] change in, [>]–[>] and wage differences, [>] See also

more success. It is a feature that has enormous implications for the future of many cities, and it is the main theme of this chapter and the next one. The moment Bezos left Manhattan and headed west, a series of events began that would ultimately bring thousands of good jobs to Seattle. Today the little outfit that Bezos started in his garage is a global brand with 51,000 employees worldwide, a third of whom are in Seattle. A second channel through which Microsoft reshaped the local economy was

but also her children. We found that only 2 percent of college-educated mothers smoked during pregnancy, compared with 17 percent of mothers with a high school education and 34 percent of mothers who dropped out of high school. College-educated mothers are significantly less likely to have children who are premature or have low birth weight, two important predictors of later health problems. Children of college-educated parents are not just healthier at birth but also tend to have more and better

Intellectual Property Organization, 2010. [>] In the United States, the top patent producers: Data come from the author’s analysis of data from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. [>] “misplaced faith”: Grove, “How America Can Create Jobs.” [>] As you can see in Figure 3: The author’s analysis is based on data from County Business Patterns, U.S. Census Bureau. [>] A recent study estimates: Hann, Viswanathan, and Koh, “The Facebook App Economy.” [>] The economist Michelle Alexopoulos has

Intellectual Property Organization, 2010. [>] In the United States, the top patent producers: Data come from the author’s analysis of data from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. [>] “misplaced faith”: Grove, “How America Can Create Jobs.” [>] As you can see in Figure 3: The author’s analysis is based on data from County Business Patterns, U.S. Census Bureau. [>] A recent study estimates: Hann, Viswanathan, and Koh, “The Facebook App Economy.” [>] The economist Michelle Alexopoulos has

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