The Whites of Their Eyes: Bunker Hill, the First American Army, and the Emergence of George Washington

The Whites of Their Eyes: Bunker Hill, the First American Army, and the Emergence of George Washington

Language: English

Pages: 432

ISBN: 0061958867

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Drawingupon new research and scholarship, historian Paul Lockhart, author of thecritically acclaimed Revolutionary War biography The Drillmaster of ValleyForge, offers a penetrating reassessment of the first major engagement ofthe American Revolution. In the tradition of David McCullough’s 1776,Lockhart illuminates the Battle of Bunker Hill as a crucial event in thecreation of an American identity, dexterously interweaving the story of thispivotal pitched battle with two other momentous narratives: the creation ofAmerica’s first army, and the rise of the man who led it, George Washington.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21–23, 84–85, 86 Skene, Phillip, 115 slaves, 104 smallpox, 83, 352, 373 prevention of, 143, 178, 357 Smith, Francis, 14–16, 18, 47, 54, 65, 71, 193, 208, 214 smugglers, 68 Soldi, Andrea, 154 Somerset, HMS, 16, 68, 71, 73–74, 150, 151, 203–4, 217–18, 224 Spencer, Joseph, 99, 102, 176, 184, 284–85, 289 Continental Army commission of, 336–37 Spitfire, HMS, 218, 223, 224 Springfield, Mass., 329 Stark, John, 6, 94, 100, 254–58, 254, 279, 321 at Breed’s Hill, 271–73, 300 at Bunker Hill,

medical practice of, 95, 144 military experience of, 144, 335–36 rebel forces at Roxbury commanded by, 144–48, 145, 150, 152–53, 167, 173, 177, 178, 183–84, 190, 206, 208, 245, 284–86, 322, 325, 327–28, 336–37, 349, 366, 368, 372–73 Thomas, Natte, 146 Thompson, Benjamin, 82 Tories, 37, 47–48, 91–92, 93, 139, 144, 152, 179 Townsend, David, 260 Trevett, Samuel, 248, 277–78, 302 Trumbull, John, 145, 284, 286 Trumbull, Jonathan, 98–99, 337, 361 Tupper, Benjamin, 350 23rd Foot Regiment

from Ordnance Store, 1775,” COMSA; Henry Dearborn, “An Account of the Battle of Bunker Hill,” The Port Folio, 4th Series, 5 (1818), 181–82. 15. William Prescott to John Adams, August 25, 1775, in Frothingham, Siege of Boston, 395. 16. John Chester to Joseph Fish, July 22, 1775, in Frothingham, Siege of Boston, 389–91. 17. Murdock, Bunker Hill, 21. 18. William Howe to Richard Lord Howe, June 22, 1775, in Historical Manuscripts Commission, Report on the Manuscripts of Mrs. Stopford-Sackville,

experience with bladder stones, which forced his retirement from the 3rd Regiment. But his health problems did not deter him from returning to public life. Along with Sam Adams and James Otis, Ward was one of the most vocal opponents of British commercial policies in the late 1760s, so much so that he was stripped of his militia rank by the royal governor. He was in the thick of things during the meetings of the Provincial Congress, too. Though in great pain from his affliction, he served without

themselves to the Regulars,” as Amos Farnsworth expressed it in his diary. Marching in an irregular column—for the Americans were not yet very accomplished at maintaining tight formations or marching in cadence—Putnam’s improvised brigade paraded over Bunker Hill, then over Breed’s Hill, not making any attempt to hide themselves from British eyes. The column descended Breed’s Hill into Charlestown itself, practically strutting along the waterfront in full view of the massive HMS Somerset and her

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