Whisky: Technology, Production and Marketing (Handbook of Alcoholic Beverages)

Whisky: Technology, Production and Marketing (Handbook of Alcoholic Beverages)

Language: English

Pages: 384

ISBN: B008CYOPGQ

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Whisky: Technology, Production and Marketing explains in technical terms, the science and technology of producing whisky, combined with information from industry experts on successfully marketing the product. World experts in Scotch whisky provide detailed insight into whisky production from the processing of raw materials, to the fermentation, distillation, maturation, blending, production of co-products and quality testing, as well as important information on the methodology used for packaging and marketing whisky in the twenty-first century. No other book covers the entire whisky process from raw material to delivery to the market in such a comprehensive manner and with such a high level of technical detail.

* Only available work to cover the entire whisky process from raw material to delivery to the market in such a comprehensive manner
* Includes a chapter on marketing and selling whisky
* Foreword written by Alan Rutherford, former Chairman and Managing Director of United Malt and Grain Distillers Ltd.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

solution. Since bourbon casks are generally only used for one filling, have been charred [15:24 13/3/03 n:/3991 RUSSELL.751/3991-001.3d] Ref: 3991 Whisky Ch 001 Page: 12 0-25 Chapter 1 History of the development of whiskey distillation 13 internally and are made from high quality oak, they are ideal for maturing light flavoured Scotch – especially the faster maturing grain spirit. To facilitate transport of empty casks, North American barrels were broken down into bundles of staves

brewing (see, for example, Hough et al., 1982; Young, 1996; Boulton and Quain, 2001; Slaughter, 2002). These reviews already provide authoritative explanations of the alcoholic fermentation of cereal-based wort, so this chapter is more concerned with the practical differences between brewery and distillery fermentations, and makes no attempt to discuss distilled products other than Scotch whisky. In both malt and grain whisky distilleries the principal sources of the congeners in new-make spirit

and copper. As mentioned earlier, the earliest whiskies were predominantly [15:24 13/3/03 n:/3991 RUSSELL.751/3991-001.3d] Ref: 3991 Whisky Ch 001 Page: 6 0-25 Chapter 1 History of the development of whiskey distillation 7 made from malted barley, but many distillers also ground unmalted wheat, barley or oats into their grists. The amount of unmalted grain that could be converted by the enzymes from the malt was no doubt estimated by empirical means, and such additions helped to reduce

and distillation equipment should certainly be cleaned to prevent development of moulds or butyric acid bacteria between periods of use, the equipment listed in Table 4.6 requires both cleaning and sterilization before each use. Although written with the brewing industry in mind, the review by Singh and Fisher (1996) on cleaning and disinfection is equally applicable to the fermentation vessels and associated pipework of the distilling industry. [15:33 13/3/03 n:/3991 RUSSELL.751/3991-004.3d]

quickly. Such problems can occur at the mashing, fermentation and distillation stages. Atypical percentages over-attenuation can be attributed to false declarations when determining the original gravities in a set washback. This is overcome by laboratory determinations of OG over at least six declared washbacks, and calculating the allowance for loss in gravity due to fermentation and to tem- [15:34 13/3/03 n:/3991 RUSSELL.751/3991-005.3d] Ref: 3991 Whisky Chapter 5 Page: 170 152-177

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